Knowledge Center | Koch Agronomic Services
Knowledge Center | Koch Agronomic Services
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Growers bear a lot of responsibility, not only for raising enough crops to fit the needs of a growing population, but to also be stewards of the land. One element key to overcoming these challenges is getting enough nitrogen in the field – and keeping it there.
Consider treating UAN investments with a nitrogen stabilizer that protects against ammonia volatilization.
Nitrogen management is essential to prevent nutrient loss, maximize yield potential and optimize economic return — it’s especially important when your nitrogen program includes a fall application. As you assess your needs and plan your fall nitrogen application program, keep these tips in mind to maximize yield and minimize loss.
Efficiently using resources and good crop management go hand-in-hand on any successful farming operation. This is no trade secret — you want to minimize the inputs needed to produce the highest yield possible. That’s why optimizing your nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) is critical to getting the most out of your fertilizer investment and ultimately, a better bottom line.
As fall approaches and soil temperatures drop, many growers in the Northern Corn Belt will be taking to the field to start fall nitrogen applications. While fall is a great time for nitrogen applications, it comes with varied weather conditions and the risk of nitrogen loss, making it beneficial to use a nitrification inhibitor such as CENTURO nitrogen stabilizer.
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In studies conducted in 2017 and 2018 by the University of Missouri showed the yield benefit of corn when using SUPERU fertilizer and AGROTAIN nitrogen stabilizer compared to ContaiN.
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Packed with unsurpassed efficiency in every granule, SUPERU premium fertilizer has been scientifically formulated to protect a grower’s nitrogen investment against volatilization, leaching and denitrification. With both urease and nitrification inhibitors, SUPERU enhances nitrogen efficiency, boosts yield and minimizes potential nitrogen loss to nearby water sources.
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Growers should soon be planning their winter top-dress applications. While crop progress and weather conditions vary, the 4Rs of fertilizer application pertain across the wheat belt.
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Record-setting rainfalls in late 2018 left many growers in the U.S., specifically the southern states and the Northeast, with saturated fields and the need for a new nitrogen game plan.
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With unpredictable spring weather, protecting your nitrogen investment is critical to your overall yield potential. Environmental factors such as soil moisture, temperature, pH and compaction can all play a role in nitrogen loss.
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Record-setting rain during the 2018 fall limited or prevented fertilizer applications in many regions of the U.S. Add to that an abundance of late winter precipitation, below average temperatures and large snow melt have led to record-setting floods in parts of the Midwest and saturated fields in other parts of the U.S., making it difficult for growers to hit the ground running this spring.
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With persistent wet weather patterns across the U.S. causing logistical strain and delay of many growers getting into their fields, some are already making the switch from anhydrous ammonia to other nitrogen sources. This means now is the time to discuss nitrogen source alternatives and nitrogen protection options with your growers.
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In a four-year study conducted by the University of Illinois, broadcasted SUPERU fertilizer at planting led the way in corn yield with an average of 229 bu/acre.
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If the last couple of years have taught us anything it’s that things don’t always go according to plan. But that doesn’t mean looking ahead is a fruitless practice. With that in mind, have you started thinking about your 2021 nitrogen plan? A strategically applied fall anhydrous ammonia can deliver significant agronomic and operational benefits come spring. But how can you be confident your nutrient investment will still be available when crops need it next year?
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For more than 25 years, AGROTAIN has been the dependable nitrogen stabilizer from Koch Agronomic Services (Koch) that has time and again helped growers optimize their yield potential. But what if there was something even better?
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With corn being planted across the Midwest, spring top-dress applications should be top-of-mind for many growers. Typical top-dress applications are applied using white urea, with this though you may be setting yourself up for increased losses to ammonia volatilization, leaching and denitrification. Better protect your nitrogen investment with SUPERU premium fertilizer.
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Nitrogen is one of the most critical nutrients for a corn crop and plays a large role in plant growth, development and yield potential. Depending on several environmental factors, nitrogen can be lost to from the rooting zone of the crop which can lead to a nitrogen deficiency.
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Fall fertilizer decisions can be one of the most important decisions a grower can make to help boost crop performance and help provide efficiencies when it comes to spring workload.
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Was your crop given the right source at the right rate, at the right time and in the right place? Learn best management practices from the 4R Nutrient Stewardship initiative.
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With several regions across the U.S. receiving little precipitation over the last few months, many growers may be questioning how the lack of rain may impact their fall anhydrous ammonia (NH3) applications.
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Rarely does Mother Nature give growers perfect weather conditions for their crops. Over the last several years, growers have dealt with weather conditions ranging from intense downfalls to warm, dry wind.
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With the recent trends of fertilizer and grain pricing, growers making spring nitrogen plans may choose to change their nitrogen needs and look at other inputs such as nitrogen stabilizers to optimize their overall profitability.
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Debunking the Myth: More Nitrogen is Not Always the Answer