Knowledge Center | Koch Agronomic Services
Knowledge Center | Koch Agronomic Services
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Consider treating UAN investments with a nitrogen stabilizer that protects against ammonia volatilization.
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Growers should soon be planning their winter top-dress applications. While crop progress and weather conditions vary, the 4Rs of fertilizer application pertain across the wheat belt.
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Urea-Ammonium Nitrate, also known as UAN, is an excellent source of nitrogen for crops. However, farmers may dismiss the risk of nitrogen loss from UAN, incorrectly assuming that liquid forms of nitrogen are not subject to appreciable volatilization losses.
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With unpredictable spring weather, protecting your nitrogen investment is critical to your overall yield potential. Environmental factors such as soil moisture, temperature, pH and compaction can all play a role in nitrogen loss.
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UAN is a combination of urea, ammonium nitrate and water that forms to combine this liquid fertilizer.
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Dealing with unknowns is nothing new in the world of agriculture. Rainfall levels, soil conditions, unforeseen maintenance costs — the list goes on and on. Local, national and international events are also capable of throwing a wrench in even the most well-run operation. The best growers don’t just understand this fact, they accept it and adapt their strategies to deal with whatever comes their way.
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The hard fact is that there are things on your operation that are out of your control. Spring rains and soil temperature both adversely impact your crop’s overall yield potential. But another fact is just as powerful – research has proven that the technology built into nitrification inhibitors can protect your UAN investment and your overall profitability.
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Nitrogen is one of the most critical nutrients for a corn crop and plays a large role in plant growth, development and yield potential. Depending on several environmental factors, nitrogen can be lost to from the rooting zone of the crop which can lead to a nitrogen deficiency.
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As fall approaches, many growers across the Great Plains will be taking to the field to start late summer and early fall nitrogen applications on wheat acres.
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Each year, new agronomic solutions are introduced for growers to consider using to help them better their operation. The best of those allow growers to use fewer resources, potentially saving them money in the long run and promoting a more sustainable future.
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Thanks to agronomic research being conducted around the world, advances are being made each day to help growers produce more with fewer resources. And that work not only helps to feed people across the globe, it also creates value for society as a whole.
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DCD or dicyandiamide is the active ingredient found in many fertilizers and additives marketed for their nitrification inhibition properties.
This episode features Kate Koehler, the director of product management and communications for Koch Agronomic Services, and Edwin Suarez, technical agronomist with Koch Agronomic Services. They discuss the information growers need to make their input plan for next season, the benefits of fall applications and how the decision to use a stabilizer can help growers achieve a higher return on their nitrogen investment.
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Was your crop given the right source at the right rate, at the right time and in the right place? Learn best management practices from the 4R Nutrient Stewardship initiative.
The Field Notes podcast series from Koch Agronomic Services (Koch) will break down the science and technology behind agronomy to help growers do more with less. Crop science experts and others in the agriculture industry will discuss topics ranging from nitrogen loss and soil health to ways growers can increase operational efficiencies.
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Rarely does Mother Nature give growers perfect weather conditions for their crops. Over the last several years, growers have dealt with weather conditions ranging from intense downfalls to warm, dry wind.
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There are several misconceptions when it comes to UAN, including that it is not subject to nitrogen loss via volatilization, with many believing the water content found in UAN is enough to protect it from above-ground losses. We’re here to dispel this myth and help growers make the most of their UAN investment.
The Field Notes podcast series from Koch Agronomic Services (Koch) will break down the science and technology behind agronomy to help growers do more with less. Crop science experts and others in the agriculture industry will discuss topics ranging from nitrogen loss and soil health to ways growers can increase operational efficiencies.
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With the recent trends of fertilizer and grain pricing, growers making spring nitrogen plans may choose to change their nitrogen needs and look at other inputs such as nitrogen stabilizers to optimize their overall profitability.
Whether you apply fall anhydrous ammonia or spring UAN, all nitrogen sources are subject to denitrification after being nitrified to the nitrate form.
If you are applying UAN or anhydrous ammonia — spring, fall or split applications alike — all nitrogen sources are subject to leaching after being nitrified to the nitrate form.
Nitrogen volatilization can occur in all weather conditions, including both warm and cold temperatures. But no matter how or when fertilizer is applied, without a stabilizer, it’s vulnerable to loss.
Because variables such as weather and soil type can all contribute to the loss of nitrogen, the process of keeping it available to nourish crops becomes complicated quickly.
You might not be able to control what you aren’t expecting, but you are capable of minimizing nitrogen loss. When your applied nitrogen is affected by ammonia volatilization, your return on investment decreases.
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For many growers, the arrival of spring means the start of a very busy season. Between planning, planting and nitrogen application, time management suddenly becomes a vital factor to your success in the field.
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