Knowledge Center | Koch Agronomic Services
Knowledge Center | Koch Agronomic Services
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“Was your crop given the right source at the right rate, at the right time and in the right place?” Learn best management practices from the 4R Nutrient Stewardship initiative.
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Koch Agronomic Services’ (KAS) next-generation nitrogen stabilizer, ANVOL™, demonstrated extended protection against nitrogen loss due to volatilization in recent research. While untreated urea lost 32 percent of its available nitrogen, urea treated with ANVOL lost just 12 percent.
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Nitrogen loss can be a serious problem impacting yield potential and return on investment. Depending on the soil type, nitrogen fertilizer is susceptible to losing more than 50% of its nitrogen through ammonia volatilization, denitrification and nitrate leaching.
The goal in crop production with nitrogen is to ensure as much of it as possible is available for plant uptake, where it can then be converted to grain throughout the growing season. While we know nitrogen is important to our crops, do we know what role it plays and how to ensure it’s available for optimal crop growth and production?
According to the National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center, growers across the U.S. may start noticing the impacts of El Niño as we progress into the fall and winter seasons.
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With roughly 90 percent of the winter wheat in the ground, growers should soon be planning their winter top-dress applications. While crop progress and weather conditions vary, the 4Rs of fertilizer application pertain across the wheat belt.
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Urea-Ammonium Nitrate, also known as UAN, is an excellent source of nitrogen for crops. However, farmers may dismiss the risk of nitrogen loss from UAN, incorrectly assuming that liquid forms of nitrogen are not subject to appreciable volatilization losses.
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If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. A cliché expression used by some to say there are things in life better left alone. For nearly 25 years, that phrase could accurately be applied to above ground urea and UAN nitrogen protection.
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Record-setting rain during the 2018 fall limited or prevented fertilizer applications in many regions of the U.S. Add to that an abundance of late winter precipitation, below average temperatures and large snow melt have led to record-setting floods in parts of the Midwest and saturated fields in other parts of the U.S., making it difficult for growers to hit the ground running this spring.
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With persistent wet weather patterns across the U.S. causing logistical strain and delay of many growers getting into their fields, some are already making the switch from anhydrous ammonia to other nitrogen sources. This means now is the time to discuss nitrogen source alternatives and nitrogen protection options with your growers.
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Late spring and summer applications of nitrogen fertilizer on pastures can boost production, but there are risks.