Knowledge Center | Koch Agronomic Services
Knowledge Center | Koch Agronomic Services
Nitrogen Loss Deep Dives: Volatilization
Article Categories: Nitrogen Loss, US, Video Player Icon VIDEO, CANADA
You might not be able to control what you aren’t expecting, but you are capable of minimizing nitrogen loss. When your applied nitrogen is affected by ammonia volatilization, your return on investment decreases.
Deep Dive Video - Volatilization

Understanding Ammonia Volatilization Losses

Ammonia volatilization, an above-ground loss of nitrogen, occurs within days of application as ammonium is converted to ammonia gas on or near the soil surface. During urea hydrolysis, the pH in and around the zone of application increases and causes ammonium to convert to ammonia gas. Surface-applied or shallow-incorporated urea or UAN are most at risk. Other risk factors include warm air temperatures, high residue, elevated soil pH, and high soil moisture.

The loss potential you face due to ammonia volatilization has an impact on your bottom line. Adding urease inhibitor solutions — like ANVOL® urease inhibitor or SUPERU® premium fertilizer — to surface applications can boost yield results compared to untreated urea.

Are you suffering from volatilization losses? Take a deep dive to learn more about what you should be doing to minimize this form of loss.



Article Categories: Nitrogen Loss, US, Video Player Icon VIDEO, CANADA
Nitrogen volatilization can occur in all weather conditions, including both warm and cold temperatures. But no matter how or when fertilizer is applied, without a stabilizer, it’s vulnerable to loss.
Article Categories: CANADA, Nitrogen Loss, US, Video Player Icon VIDEO